Max Dragon Breathes Fire!Fractured surface of a nanocrystalline magnesium matrix composite reinforced with Ti2AlC. A Ti2AlC grain kinked several times during fracture to form a “dragon”. Credit: Babak Anasori (Prof. Michel W. Barsoum, MAX Phase Research Group), Zeiss Supra 50VP SEM in Drexel University’s Centralized Research Facilities
Materials for EnergyCarbon nanotubes in free-standing macroscale sheets. Densely-packed carbon nanotubes are one of a few promising approaches for electrical energy storage. Credit: Min Heon & Boris Dyatkin (NanoMaterials Group), Zeiss Supra 50VP SEM (6,000x) in Drexel University’s Centralized Research Facilities
Silicon NanoconesGrown in a chemical vapor deposition chamber, these tapered semiconductor nanowires have applications in solar cells, antireflective coatings, and Li-ion batteries.

Credit: Jennifer S. Atchison (Prof. Caroline Schauer, Natural Polymer and Photonics Laboratory), Amray 1850 FE (5,000x) in the MesoMaterials Laboratory
The Mouths That Feed The BeastFanglike structures that make up a squid tentacle. Each small “mouth” is approximately 400μm in diameter. Credit: Jessica Schiffman (Prof. Caroline Schauer, Natural Polymer and Photonics Laboratory), Zeiss Supra 50VP SEM in Drexel University’s Centralized Research Facilities
Materials Shish KebabsWhat looks like red astroturf is actually how tiny carbon nanotubes template macromolecular chains upon crystallization of the latter, forming nano-hybrid shish kebabs, a new class of hybrid materials.   Credit: Professor Christopher Li and Ph.D. candidate Eric Laird of the Soft Materials Lab
Psychedelic Optical MaterialsThis image of dancing rubber balls is actually the electron localization function (ELF) for the rationally designed benign polar material Ba4B11O20F, which exhibits a large second harmonic generation that may soon find application in non-linear optical technologies, such as in lasers, optical signal processing, and biological imaging. Credit: Professor James Rondinelli and the Materials Theory and Design Group
The Happy 2-D WorldThis image is a combination of three separate Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images of two-dimensional MXene particles. The width of the cave is about 3µm. Winner: Second Place in “Science as Art” competition, MRS Fall 2012. Credit: Babak Anasori, Michael Naguib, Yury Gogotsi and Michel W. Barsoum (Max Phase Group and Nano Materials Group), Zeiss Supra 50VP SEM in Drexel University’s Centralized Research Facilities (CRF).
Nano GoldfishScanning Electron Microscope image of exfoliated layers of two-dimensional Ti3C2 created by etching aluminum out of Ti3AlC2. The goldfish on the image is 12μm long.
Winner of Nano Today front cover competition 2012, Nano Today, Vol 7, No. 1, February 2012
Credit: Babak Anasori, Michael Naguib, Yury Gogotsi and Michel W. Barsoum, Zeiss Supra 50VP SEM in Drexel University’s Centralized Research Facilities (CRF).
The CliffSEM image of exfoliated layers of Ti3C2 winner of the People’s Choice Award, NSF and Science Visualization Challenge at the 2012 International Science & Engineering Visualization Challenge of the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Journal Science, The award was highlighted in Science, Vol. 335 pp. 526-527 (2012). Credit: Babak Anasori, Michael Naguib, Yury Gogotsi and Michel W. Barsoum (MAX phase group and Drexel nanotechnology institute), Zeiss Supra 50VP SEM in Drexel University’s Centralized Research Facilities (CRF).
MXene Turtle SEM image of the exfoliated layers of Ti3C2. The turtle is 9µm wide. Award: Roland B. Snow Award for Best of the Show 2012 First Place in Scanning Electron microscopy category, American Ceramic society (ACerS) Ceramographic Exhibit, MS&T 2012, Pittsburgh, PA Credit: Babak Anasori, Michael Naguib, Yury Gogotsi and Michel W. Barsoum (MAX phase group and Drexel nanotechnology institute), Zeiss Supra 50VP SEM in Drexel University’s Centralized Research Facilities (CRF).

Profiles

Michael Naguib Abdelmalak

The MAX phase research and publications of Professor Michel Barsoum and his team at Drexel over the last 15 years persuaded me to come here, and it was a happy coincidence that Dr. Tamer El-Raghy, who was the first student who worked with Prof. Barsoum on MAX phases, got his B.Sc. and M.Sc. from the same school where I got mine, Cairo University. read more »

Laura Allan

I like the size of the department. We’re small enough that we all know each other and the staff knows each of us well, but large enough to have awesome research opportunities for undergraduates as well as graduates. read more »

Abraham Crook

I wanted a program where I could be hands-on and comprehensively learn the materials I was studying in my courses. Drexel’s Materials Department had so many opportunities available for me to get involved with right away, I knew it was where I wanted to go for my degree. read more »

Kristy Jost

I want to develop real clothes that integrate technology in a very practical way. I want the technology to be accessible to everyone. I want to bridge the gap between design and science and make quality and beautiful materials, turning them into fabrics and full garments. read more »

Farrah Moldover

An attraction to join Drexel Materials was that there was something special about the small, intimate, but highly visible department that provided me a sense of belonging, which I had been longing to find. The professors were accessible outside the classroom and showed a true interest in their students’ performance. read more »

Stephen Niezgoda

The biggest thing I learned during my Ph.D. was that you can't be rigid or inflexible in your thinking or interests. I changed topics quite drastically between my Ph.D. work and post-doc, however, having a firm grounding on how to develop a research topic made this easy. read more »

Brittany Pattinson

I feel that Drexel has really prepared me for the classes I’m taking here, which are second year Master’s classes. I think this program is completely cohesive with Drexel’s Materials program and I know it’s going to be a great and rewarding experience. I’m meeting great people and seeing beautiful places, doing so many things I wouldn’t have been able to otherwise. read more »

Amanda Pentecost

I knew that this experience abroad would be more than just expanding my knowledge as a scientific researcher – it would also test my limits as a growing college student. read more »

Riju Singhal

My Ph.D. work has helped me understand how to work in a team and helped me develop independent thinking. My work has also been quite challenging and I have been lucky to meet it with success on a few occasions. read more »

Gregory Vetterick

I feel that my Drexel Materials degree has prepared me to handle a future in any of the three career sectors: academia, industry, or federal (national laboratories), and has given me the opportunity to seek the career I desire. read more »